Reporting a Rare Bird Sighting

Part of the excitement of birding comes when we find something unusual, something rare or unexpected that we can relish and share with others. But telling others about your finding, in person or on the internet, is fleeting. Even more important, for the ornithological record, is documenting your record in a permanent way. Reports of rarities, when they can be authenticated and published, help to fill out the total picture of our local avifauna. As records, they can help us all to recognize habitats, regions, or seasons in which scarce species are most likely to be found.

Tips on Documenting Bird Sightings

Why Submit Documentation?

Any scientific report of an unusual phenomenon must be supported by documentation: that is, verifiable evidence reported and vouched for by a first-hand observer, submitted for peer review before acceptance and publication. In general, the rarer and more interesting the occurrence, the more important it is to document and verify it for the record. You may complete the online form below, or print and send in the online OBRC Submission Form

The Importance of Chimney Swift ConservationChimney_swift

Chimney Swifts have declined by over 50% in just the last 40 years. Chimney Swifts can be helped by making chimneys accessible for the birds or by building Chimney Swift Towers – specially designed nesting/roosting towers.
 
WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP
 
Plant native trees, shrubs, flowers and grasses that attract more insects than non-native plants. Chimney Swifts feed exclusively on flying insects which are crucial during the breeding season.
Investigate an alternative venting system if you are converting a furnace or hot water heater to gas, leaving the chimney unlined and uncapped for the swifts.
Work with an experienced chimney sweep company that can speak to the issue of Chimney Swift conservation and chimney maintenance.
Encourage your neighborhood parks, schools, and businesses to build chimney swift towers.
Work with local conservation groups to raise awareness of the need for uncapped chimneys for Chimney Swift conservation.

News & Events

A Very Special Moment in Summit County

A Very Special Moment in Summit County

On Tuesday, August 25th, a report came in on Ohio Chase Birds about a Brown Booby at Nimisila Reservoir in Summit County, Ohio. The bird was found by Henry Trimpe and hundreds of birders have since gone to see this bird over the past few days. Chris Collins, of the...

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Where We Are Birding – September

Where We Are Birding – September

Each month, our OOS Regional Directors are sharing their favorite birding hotspots in their respective regions - and beyond. These include some well-know destinations, specialty spots for specific species, and their own secret, treasured local patches. Have a favorite...

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Life as a Traveling Field Biologist

Life as a Traveling Field Biologist

In May 2019, I graduated from The Ohio State University with a B.Sc. degree in Wildlife Science, and immediately began working for Black Swamp Bird Observatory as their spring bird banding apprentice. After that I moved to Wisconsin for a few months to work with...

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